The Open Source Professor (Screencast)

The folks at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) have posted an audio podcast of my recent Digital Dialogue presentation, “The Open Source Professor: Teaching, Research, and Transparency.”

As entertaining as it might be to hear me talk for thirty minutes, I thought it would be better to see the visuals that accompanied my presentation. So I’ve put together a screencast combining the audio and my slideshow. I shaved off the 30 minute Q&A session that followed, not because it wasn’t interesting (it truly was), but because I didn’t have a handy set of visual adds to go along with it. Perhaps I’ll create a screencast for the discussion part of the day, once I have time to put together some scenes that make sense.

In any case, here it is, “The Open Source Professor” as presented to MITH on October 27, 2009 (click the light green arrow under the slide to get started):

3 thoughts on “The Open Source Professor (Screencast)

  1. This is something really interesting, cant imagine refering to other professor’s material if I am not satisfied with my professor. However, the question is how many professors will be willing to go naked specially the “stereotypes”. Do you have thoughts in revolutionizing this concept for acceptance in the teaching industry?

    Tapan Khatri
    Graduate Student – Telecommunications
    University of Maryland – College Park

    p.s.: I am sorry to ask this if this was covered in the presentation since I just skimmed through the presentation.

  2. Pingback: Briefly Noted for November 10, 2009

  3. Just finished watching the presentation. Excellent. I hope more people will pick up on your example, it seems that this is the way for the future.

    Out of curiosity, you talked about the process of making teaching public. What about live-casting classes? It would be fairly easy to do and it has a pretty minor investment in equipment and time. Even taking the live streams and setting them up to be re-viewable by anyone would take very little time on the right platform.

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