Digital Humanities at MLA 2014

This is a list of digitally-inflected sessions at the 2014 Modern Language Association Convention (Chicago, January 9-12). These sessions in some way address digital tools, objects, and practices in language, literary, textual, cultural, and media studies. The list also includes sessions about digital pedagogy and scholarly communication. The list stands at 78 entries, making up less than 10% of the total 810 convention slots. Please leave a comment if this list is missing any relevant sessions.

The title of each panel links back to its official description in the convention program, which occasionally includes supplemental material uploaded by panel participants. Also running throughout the convention is the digitally-focused Pathfinders Exhibit: 25 years of Experimental Literary Art, in Sheraton II, Ballroom, Level 4.

3. Get Started in the Digital Humanities with Help from DHCommons

Thursday, 9 January, 8:30–11:30 a.m., Chicago A–B, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Ryan Cordell, Northeastern Univ.; Josh Honn, Northwestern Univ.; Katherine A. Rowe, Bryn Mawr Coll.

The workshop welcomes language and literature scholars who wish to learn about, pursue, or join digital humanities (DH) projects but do not have the institutional infrastructure to support them. Representatives of DH projects and initiatives will share their expertise on project design, outline available resources and opportunities, and lead small-group training sessions on DH technologies and skills. Preregistration required.

15. How to Do Things with New Media in Medieval Studies

Thursday, 9 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Huron, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Mary Kate Hurley, Ohio Univ., Athens

Speakers: Angela Bennett Segler, New York Univ.; Maria Sachiko Cecire, Bard Coll.; Michael Sarabia, Univ. of Iowa

This hybrid roundtable on intersections of theory and praxis in our forays into the digital reconstruction of the premodern world will address questions such as: How can we connect the practical approach to digital resources with the theoretical materials that have been amassed in media studies? What does the praxis of digital humanities say about the theory of new media, and vice versa?

38. Digital Practice: Literary Remediations

Thursday, 9 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Arkansas, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Richard E. Langston, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  1. “The Fate of Literary Studies in the Age of Hyperculturality,” Rolf Johannes Goebel, Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville
  2. “Mimicking the Avant-Garde: Intellectual and Artistic Activism in the Digital Age,” Patrizia C. McBride, Cornell Univ.
  3. “Computer Poems and Critical Coding: Redefining Subjectivity for the Digital Age,” Kurt Beals, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

Responding: Leslie Morris, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

For abstracts, visit german.berkeley.edu/transit.

39. Haunting Narratives: Folklore’s Contribution to Narrative Studies

Thursday, 9 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Grace, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Camilla Henriette Mortensen, Lane Community Coll., OR

  1. “‘We Have Always Slain Dragons': Negotiating Empathy and Villainy through Narrative Study,” Shelley Ingram, Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette
  2. “‘Then There’s a Pair of Us!': Fetishism and the Construction of Ghostly Folk in and through Literature,” Todd Richardson, Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha
  3. “At the Intersection of Land and Water: Using Topic Models and Morphologies to Understand Folk Narrative,” John Laudun, Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette

For abstracts, visit commons.mla.org/docs/haunted-narratives-the-contributions-of-folklore-studies-to-understandings-of-american-imaginations/.

66. The Semipublic Intellectual? Academia, Criticism, and the Internet Age

Thursday, 9 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Chicago H, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Liliana M. Loofbourow, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Phillip Maciak, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge

Speakers: Natalia Cecire, Yale Univ.; Hua Hsu, Vassar Coll.; Evan Kindley, Claremont McKenna Coll.; Sharon Marcus, Columbia Univ.; Anne Helen Petersen, Whitman Coll.; Salamishah Tillet, Univ. of Pennsylvania

This roundtable seeks to address both the possibilities and the professional anxieties brought about by the new boom in online academic writing. Representing a diverse array of writing and editing experiences in and out of the profession, the panelists will be in a unique position to reflect on the goals and realities of taking scholarship to new publics.

80. Hard Mode: Games and Narratives of Marginalization

Thursday, 9 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Huron, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Anastasia Salter, Univ. of Baltimore

Speakers: Edmond Chang, Drew Univ.; Eileen Cheng-Yin Chow, Duke Univ.; Adeline Koh, Richard Stockton Coll. of New Jersey

For extended abstracts and links to works under discussion, visit hardmode.selfloud.net.

Mainstream video games often reflect culturally dominant discourse, with narratives that fail to include marginalized or “vulnerable” voices and groups. As video games are becoming an increasingly visible form of storytelling and entertainment, what role can games from outside these norms play in subverting such marginalizing representations?

91. Technologies of Translation

Thursday, 9 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Ontario, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Michael Emmerich, Univ. of California, Los Angeles

  1. “How Digital Archives Transform the Praxis of Literary Translation,” Jonathan Baillehache, Univ. of Georgia
  2. “Digital Palimpsests: Translation, Curatorial Practice, and the Interactive Text of Online Magazines,” Megan Berkobien, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  3. “Computational Tracking of Cross-Cultural and Cross-Lingual Markers in Translation Corpora,” Eugenia Kelbert, Yale Univ.; Saša Mile Rudan, Oslo Univ.
  4. “Digital Pedagogy: The ‘Li Sao’ in Translation,” Monica Zikpi, Univ. of Oregon

98. Vulnerable Texts in Digital Literary Studies

Thursday, 9 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: John David Zuern, Univ. of Hawai’i, Mānoa

  1. “Lossless Interactivity? Preservation and Adaptation across Meanwhile‘s Media Editions,” Jeremy Douglass, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  2. “The Liminal Textuality of Comments in Code,” Rachael Sullivan, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  3. “Close, Distant, and Curatorial: Responsible Reading in Digital Literary Studies,” John David Zuern

108. Power Searching the MLA International Bibliography

Thursday, 9 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Sheffield, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Barbara Chen, MLA

“How to Maximize Your Research with the MLA International Bibliography,” Gregory Grazevich, MLA

121. Homo-reproductions

Thursday, 9 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Armitage, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Valerie Rohy, Univ. of Vermont

  1. “The Future in Ruins,” Valerie Rohy
  2. “Homo-sustainability,” Abby Goode, Rice Univ.
  3. “Repro Redux: The Denials of Digital Generation,” Judith A. Roof, Rice Univ.

For abstracts, visit homoreproductions.commons.mla.org/.

128. Forgotten Sources, Alternative Archives

Thursday, 9 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Sean O’Toole, Baruch Coll., City Univ. of New York

  1. “Pickwick’s Other Papers,” Carrie Sickmann Han, Indiana Univ., Bloomington
  2. “Coded Critiques in Postwar Spain: Reading Gabriela Mistral in the Poetry of Jose Luis Hidalgo,” Elizabeth Hochberg, Princeton Univ.
  3. “The Residue of History in New Media Archives,” Augusta Rohrbach, Washington State Univ., Pullman

For abstracts, write to sean.otoole@baruch.cuny.edu.

130. Things My Computer Taught Me about Poems

Thursday, 9 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Sheffield, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Meredith Martin, Princeton Univ.

  1. “Millay and Her Books,” Amanda L. French, George Mason Univ.
  2. “What Does Style Really Mean? A Comparative Analysis of the Poetry of Christina Rossetti and Elizabeth Barrett Browning,” Natalie M. Houston, Univ. of Houston, University Park
  3. “Turbulence and Temporality: (Re)Visualizing Poetic Time,” Katharine Coles, Univ. of Utah; Julie Lein, Univ. of Utah

For abstracts, visit amandafrench.net/2013/03/28/things-my-computer-poems.

149. Online Courses: Challenges and Opportunities

Thursday, 9 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Addison, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Debra Ann Castillo, Cornell Univ.

Speakers: Al Filreis, Univ. of Pennsylvania; William Albert Pannapacker, Hope Coll.; Lois Parkinson Zamora, Univ. of Houston, University Park

155. Literary Criticism at the Macroscale: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Textual Circulation

Thursday, 9 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Parlor C, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Hoyt Long, Univ. of Chicago

  1. “The Werther Effect: Topologies of Transnational Literary Circulation in the Eighteenth Century,” Andrew Piper, McGill Univ.
  2. “Trade Imbalance in the World Republic of Letters: Transnational Culture through the Lens of Big Data,” Hoyt Long
  3. “Quantitative Literary Studies in a Transnational Age,” Ted Underwood, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana
  4. “Transnational Literary Studies in a Quantitative Age,” C. P. Haun Saussy, Univ. of Chicago

168. Augmented Reality for Teaching and Learning in the Humanities

Thursday, 9 January, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Lincolnshire, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Julie Sykes, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque

Speakers: Jason B. Jones, Central Connecticut State Univ.; Julie Sykes

Participants will be introduced to various practical ways of utilizing mobile technology in the humanities classroom. Current projects addressing language learning and literary studies will be presented. Participants will engage in an augmented reality experience and begin to create relevant learning activities for their learning contexts. Participants are encouraged to bring their own iOS devices (iPhone, iTouch, iPad).

173. Beyond the Protomonograph: New Models for the Dissertation

Thursday, 9 January, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Northwestern–Ohio State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Daniel Powell, Univ. of Victoria

Speakers: Melissa A. Dalgleish, York Univ.; Shawn Moore, Texas A&M Univ., College Station; James O’Sullivan, University Coll. Cork; Nick Sousanis, Columbia Univ.; Danielle Spinosa, York Univ.; Nicholas van Orden, Univ. of Alberta

Although the need for graduate education reform in the humanities is widely discussed, the traditional role of the dissertation as a capstone protomonograph has only begun to be questioned. This panel features six Pecha Kucha presentations (20 slides x 20 seconds) from graduate students developing radically new models of the dissertation, followed by ample discussion.

187. Teaching outside the Classroom through Digital Humanities: Alt-Academic Feminism

Thursday, 9 January, 7:00–8:15 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Teresa Mangum, Univ. of Iowa

Speakers: Anne Balsamo, New School; Natalie M. Houston, Univ. of Houston, University Park; Tara McPherson, Univ. of Southern California; Safiya Umoja Noble, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana; Roopika Risam, Salem State Univ.

For position statements and resources, write to teresa-mangum@uiowa.edu.

Can digital and public humanities reshape studies by and about women in language, art, and culture? Feminists, people of color, LGBT communities, and differently abled and aged women are creating collaborative spaces despite uneven developments and digital divides. How can digital tools and practices serve feminist pedagogy and critique, resituating feminism within and beyond the academy?

199. Digital Queers, Queering the Digital: Gaming, Programming, Performance

Friday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Northwestern–Ohio State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Martha Nell Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Speakers: Thom Bryce, York Univ.; Edward Chamberlain, Univ. of Washington, Tacoma; Edmond Chang, Drew Univ.; Kimberly Hall, Univ. of California, Riverside; Hannele Kivinen, York Univ.

Responding: Marilee Lindemann, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

This roundtable analyzes queer online performances that critique the exclusionary practices of dominant American culture, queering codes in game programming, and queer approaches to new media to make visible that opportunities afforded by queer bodies extend well beyond remembering Alan Turing, the gay iconic code breaker cited by some as historical proof of digital humanities diversity.

207. Diversifying the Victorian Verse Archives

Friday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Chicago A–B, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Meredith Martin, Princeton Univ.

  1. “Recovering Tennyson’s ‘Melody in Poetry': Salon Recitations and Musical Settings,” Phyllis Weliver, Saint Louis Univ.
  2. “Morris Metrics: The Work of Meter in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” Yopie Prins, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  3. “Digital Archives and the Music of Victorian Poetry,” Joanna Swafford, Univ. of Virginia

For abstracts, visit https://sites.google.com/a/slu.edu/diversifying-the-victorian-verse-archives/.

213. Twenty-First-Century Pedagogies

Friday, 10 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Michigan–Michigan State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Stacey Lee Donohue, Central Oregon Community Coll.

  1. “Not on Wikipedia: Making the Local Visible,” Laurel Harris, Queensborough Community Coll., City Univ. of New York
  2. “Survival Spanish Online: Designing a Community College Course That Bridges Culture and Authentic Connections,” Cecilia McGinniss Kennedy, Clark State Community Coll., OH
  3. “Sound Essays: A Cure for the Common Core,” Kathryn O’Donoghue, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York
  4. “Leveling Up! Gamifying the Literature Classroom,” Jessica Lewis-Turner, Temple Univ., Philadelphia

For abstracts, visit commons.mla.org/groups/the-two-year-college/announcements/ after 15 Dec.

233. Seeing with Numbers: Sociological and Macroanalytic Approaches to Literary Exclusion

Friday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Chicago F, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Richard Jean So, Univ. of Chicago

  1. “Modernism’s Limits: Patterns of Exclusion in Scholarly Reading,” Andrew Goldstone, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick
  2. “Finding Thomas Curtis Clark: Topic Modeling the Rules of Exclusion in American Modernist Poetry,” Richard Jean So

Responding: Amy Hungerford, Yale Univ.; Matthew Jockers, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

For abstracts, visit lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/literarynetworks/.

239. Vulnerable Times in the Archive: Forgotten Modernist Literary Magazines

Friday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Kane, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Belinda Wheeler, Paine Coll.

Speakers: Suzanne Wintsch Churchill, Davidson Coll.; Anne Donlon, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Paul Hjartarson, Univ. of Alberta; Hannah McGregor, Univ. of Alberta; Elizabeth O’Connor, Washington Coll.

Following Marianne Hirsch’s presidential theme, this roundtable explores various modernist literary magazines that “have been marginalized, forgotten, or omitted from dominant histories.” Though these magazines’ overlooked status might be seen as a weakness, the participants illustrate how these documents and current periodical scholarship have created what Hirsch calls “a space for engagement and resistance.”

245. Beyond the MOOC: The Online Seminar

Friday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Grace, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Margaret Lamont, Stanford Univ.

  1. “Re-placing Synchronous Classrooms at Stanford’s Online High School,” Adam Rzepka, Stanford Univ.
  2. “The United States and the Middle East at the Virtual Table,” Maggie N. Nassif, Brigham Young Univ., UT
  3. “Engaging Long-Distance Learners: Personalization, Communication, and Application Integration,” Erin Kingsley, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder

253. Gaming across the Curriculum: The Write Game

Friday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Michigan–Michigan State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Catherine Jean Prendergast, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

  1. “Mystorical Play: On Ludic Invention of Knowledge,” Jan Holmevik, Clemson Univ.
  2. “Replayability and Revision: Writing Over and Over,” Cynthia Haynes, Clemson Univ.
  3. “Augmented Reality Games: Engines of Reflection,” Virginia Kuhn, Univ. of Southern California

259. The Twenty-First-Century Library: Discovery Services versus Subject Specialists

Friday, 10 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Huron, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: James Raymond Kelly, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

Speakers: Laura R. Braunstein, Dartmouth Coll.; Barbara Chen, MLA; Sarah G. Wenzel, Univ. of Chicago

Currently the style of providing research access to online catalogs and databases for undergraduate students is through the use of a discovery system. Some panelists will discuss how traditional methods are a more logical means to the desired end, while others will discuss how they have used discovery services successfully in research instruction in both writing and literature classrooms.

284. Digital Humanities and French Renaissance Culture

Friday, 10 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Columbus, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Jacqueline D. Wernimont, Scripps Coll.

  1. “Translations of Translations: From Latin to French to Digital,” Anneliese Pollock, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  2. “Digitizing the French Sixteenth Century: Unblocking the Literary Canon,” Hassan Melehy, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  3. “The Montaigne Project,” Philippe Desan, Univ. of Chicago

Responding: Dorothea Heitsch, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

291. Torture and Popular Culture

Friday, 10 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Hillary L. Chute, Univ. of Chicago

  1. “Shocking Media: The Abu Ghraib Photographs and Zero Dark Thirty,” Liz Maynes-Aminzade, Harvard Univ.
  2. “Animal Cruelty: The Cinema of Kathryn Bigelow,” Christopher Pizzino, Univ. of Georgia
  3. “Torture, Rebirth, and Revelation in V for Vendetta and Save the Green Planet,” Peter Yoonsuk Paik, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
  4. “Sites of Pain: The Expressive Work of Spaces of Torture in Video Games,” Mark Sample, George Mason Univ.

299. What Is Data in Literary Studies?

Friday, 10 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Michigan–Michigan State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: James F. English, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Speakers: David Alworth, Harvard Univ.; Eric Hayot, Penn State Univ., University Park; Heather Houser, Univ. of Texas, Austin; Lauren Klein, Georgia Inst. of Tech.; Peter M. Logan, Temple Univ., Philadelphia; Scott Selisker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

This roundtable will consider questions about data in literary studies beyond the usual debates over digital method and quantification. Does our discipline have a coherent concept of data? Are there kinds of data that are specific to literary studies or that only exist as products of literary research? What is the relation between literary data and literary theory? Is data political?

307. Getting Funded in the Humanities: An NEH Workshop

Friday, 10 January, 1:30–3:30 p.m., Chicago VIII, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Jason Rhody, National Endowment for the Humanities

This workshop will highlight recent awards and outline current funding opportunities. In addition to emphasizing grant programs that support individual and collaborative research and education, the workshop will include information on the NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities. A question-and-answer period will follow.

323. Trauma, Memory, Vulnerability

Friday, 10 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Chicago IX, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Susan Rubin Suleiman, Harvard Univ.

  1. “Trauma Theory for Implicated Subjects,” Michael Rothberg, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana
  2. “Cyberpoetics and Cryptopolitics: Facebook Pages as Memory Portals,” Ananya Jahanara Kabir, King’s Coll. London
  3. “Embodying Postconflict Memories: Teatro Testimonial in Chile,” Maria José Contreras, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  4. “Culture of Memory and Human Rights: New Constellations,” Andreas A. Huyssen, Columbia Univ.

Responding: Susan Rubin Suleiman

Bringing vulnerability to bear on the politics of trauma and memory studies, the session will illustrate new constellations in the field. Looking at memory’s multidirectional and global circulation—from Europe to East Asia and Latin America—papers will engage embodiment, performance, and digital media, as well as complicity and human rights.

337. New Digital Vanguards in Spanish Literature

Friday, 10 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Parlor F, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Alexandra Saum-Pascual, Univ. of California, Berkeley

  1. “Print Alternatives: Hybrid Spanish Writing Today,” Alexandra Saum-Pascual
  2. “Digital Technology and New Forms of Literature from a Hispanic Perspective,” Sergi Rivero-Navarro, Harvard Univ.
  3. “Interstory: Three Narratives in Media Convergence,” Elika Ortega Guzman, Univ. of Western Ontario
  4. “Technological Expropriation in Latin American Poetry: A Historical Perspective,” Marcos Wasem, Bard Coll.

For abstracts, visit hybridspanish.commons.mla.org/ after 1 Dec.

339. New Ways of Reading: Surface Reading and Digital Methods

Friday, 10 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Chicago D, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Mara Mills, New York Univ.

Speakers: Stephen M. Best, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Alexander Gil, Columbia Univ.; Heather K. Love, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Sharon Marcus, Columbia Univ.; Ted Underwood, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

For papers and digital examples, visit www.surfacereading.org after 1 Dec.

This session considers intersections between new work on reading and digital methods. It emerges from a collaboration that includes a book project (Surface Reading: History, Theory, Practice) and a digital project. Speakers will report on digital experiments in classes they taught in fall 2012.

350. Open Access: Editing Online Scholarly Journals

Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., O’Hare, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Helena Gurfinkel, Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville

Speakers: Nicole N. Aljoe, Northeastern Univ.; Alan Clinton, Santa Clara Univ.; David Gunkel, Northern Illinois Univ.; Helena Gurfinkel; Laura L. Runge, Univ. of South Florida

Responding: Henry S. Sussman, Yale Univ.

The roundtable will address the logistics of founding and maintaining a journal; potential nonspecialized readership; the evaluation of open-access publications, as well as of the work of editing, in the context of hiring, tenure, and promotion; and peer-review practices that follow the open-access principle, while responding to tenure and promotion requirements.

368. East Asian Traditional Poetry in the Digital Age

Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Huron, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Paul Rouzer, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

  1. “Rereading Chinese Poetry in a Digital Context,” Graham Sanders, Univ. of Toronto
  2. “‘Du Fu Is Busy!': Classical Poetry on the Chinese Internet,” Xiaofei Tian, Harvard Univ.
  3. “Shiki’s Social Media: Print, Internet, and Haiku in Nineteenth- and Twenty-First-Century Japan,” Robert Tuck, Univ. of Montana
  4. “Traditional Poetry and Digital Pedagogy,” Monica Zikpi, Univ. of Oregon

369. The Twenty-First-Century University: Gender, Technology, and Learning

Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Michigan B, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Shaden M. Tageldin, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities

  1. “Feminist Dialogues on Technology,” Elizabeth Mathews Losh, Univ. of California, San Diego
  2. “Hybridizing Foreign Languages: Gender and Professionalization,” Charlotte Ann Melin, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  3. “The Gender Factor in Technology-Enhanced Language Courses,” Fernando Rubio, Univ. of Utah

For abstracts, visit commons.mla.org/ after 9 Dec.

377. Making Sense of Big Data

Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Erie, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Helen Thompson, Northwestern Univ.

  1. “Of Archives and Algorithms: EEBO (Early English Books Online) and the Challenges of Big Data,” Anupam Basu, Washington Univ. in St. Louis
  2. “Fragments of Fiction: Heterogeneity and the Early Novel in the Digital Archive,” Mark Algee-Hewitt, Stanford Univ.
  3. “Scale and Precision: Having It All,” Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

For abstracts and links, visit idhmc.tamu.edu/MLA2014.

379. Culture and Activism in the 2011–13 Russian Protest Movements

Friday, 10 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Parlor C, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Katharine Holt, Columbia Univ.

  1. “Protest and Digital Aesthetics,” Marijeta Bozovic, Colgate Univ.
  2. “When the Digerati Take to the Street (and Airwaves): Alexei Navalny, Sergei Minaev, and the Offline Transposition of the New Media Intelligentsia,” Michael Gorham, Univ. of Florida
  3. “Pussy Riot Democracy: Notes on Ethnography and Russian Activism,” Frances Harrison, Binghamton Univ., State Univ. of New York
  4. “Postsocialist Political Depression and the Refiguring of Liberalism: Imagining Social Change in and around the Protests,” Adam Leeds, Univ. of Pennsylvania

For abstracts, visit mlaslavic.blogspot.com.

399. MOOCs, Boutique Subjects, and Marginal Approaches

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Dorothy Kim, Vassar Coll.

Speakers: Rebecca Davis, Saint Edward’s Univ.; Wendy Marie Hoofnagle, Univ. of Northern Iowa; Helene Scheck, Univ. at Albany, State Univ. of New York; Sonam Singh, Barnard Coll.; Lisa M. C. Weston, California State Univ., Fresno

For abstracts, visit hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/smfs/mff/index.html.

This roundtable addresses what happens to marginal approaches (e.g., feminist, queer, disability, racial) and boutique subjects (e.g., medieval studies) in the MOOC paradigm.

402. Beyond the Digital: Pattern Recognition and Interpretation

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Sheraton I, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Brian Croxall, Emory Univ.

Speakers: Jeffrey Binder, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Ryan Cordell, Northeastern Univ.; Collin Jennings, New York Univ.; Cedrick May, Univ. of Texas, Arlington; James O’Sullivan, University Coll. Cork; Lisa Marie Rhody, George Mason Univ.; Shawna Ross, Arizona State Univ. Polytechnic

For abstracts and methods, visit ach.org/ach-sessions after 1 Dec.

In discussions of digital humanities we sometimes forget that the output of digital analysis is not the goal; rather, it is a means to an end: the interpretation of a text. This panel will feature brief presentations that offer interpretations of patterns found with a digital approach. Crucially, however, presenters will speak not about methods but instead about interpretations and conclusions.

403. Words, Works, and New Archives: Studying African American Literature in the Twenty-First Century

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Michigan–Michigan State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Warren Carson, Univ. of South Carolina, Spartanburg

  1. “The Field and Function of African American Literary Scholarship: A Memorial and a Challenge,” Dana A. Williams, Howard Univ.
  2. “Chaos, Digital Humanities, and Change in Twenty-First-Century African American Literary Study,” Jerry W. Ward, Central China Normal Univ.
  3. “The Black Book: Creating an Interactive Research Environment,” Kenton Rambsy, Univ. of Kansas
  4. “Keepin’ It Interactive: Hip-Hop in the Age of Digital Reproduction,” Regina Bradley, Kennesaw State Univ.; Jeremy Dean, Rap Genius, Inc.

405. Meeting Where Students Are: Faculty-Library Collaborations and Undergraduate Research

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Ohio, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Dawn Childress, Penn State Univ., University Park

Speakers: Susanna Boylston, Davidson Coll.; Anne Geller, Saint John’s Univ., NY; Laura E. McGrane, Haverford Coll.; Susette Newberry, Cornell Univ.; Jennifer Rajchel, Haverford Coll.; Blythe E. Roveland-Brenton, Saint John’s Univ., NY

For abstracts, visit wp.me/p29LID-1A after 1 Dec.

Panelists will discuss collaborations among librarians and faculty members that create curriculum-based research opportunities for students in the use, building, and interpretation of collections. Perspectives on introducing students to the protocols of research include the literary-critical, archival, programmatic, and compositional and cross the analog-digital divide in their methods and tools.

409. Innovative Interventions in Scholarly Editing

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Colorado, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Stephen G. Nichols, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD; Raymond G. Siemens, Univ. of Victoria

Speakers: Kathleen Fitzpatrick, MLA; Julia H. Flanders, Northeastern Univ.; Steven E. Jones, Loyola Univ., Chicago; Peter Robinson, Univ. of Saskatchewan; Timothy L. Stinson, North Carolina State Univ.

Responding: Susan Schreibman, Trinity Coll. Dublin

Explores editorial innovation, considered in the context of the field’s principles and practices, including those associated with the CSE and the award of its seal for approved editions. Presenters will address, among other topics, the role of editing in new Commons-oriented publication platforms, the uses of new media in scholarly editing, and the relation of the scholarly edition to the data that underlies it.

416. Digital Practice: Moving Images

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Arkansas, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Deniz Göktürk, Univ. of California, Berkeley

  1. “The Nature of Digital Images,” Carsten Strathausen, Univ. of Missouri, Columbia
  2. “Remixing Herzog: Auteurship and Participation in the Digital Age,” Tara Hottman, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  3. “The Documentary Tradition in the Digital Age,” Verena Kick, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Responding: Eric C. Ames, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

For abstracts, visit german.berkeley.edu/transit.

418. Vulnerability and Survivalism of the Humanities in Corporatized Academia

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Erie, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Steven Hymowech, Fulton-Montgomery Community Coll., NY

  1. “Right Leaders of Wrong: A Revolution in Higher Education,” Jesse Stommel, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison
  2. “Banding Together in the Face of the Coming ‘Apocalypse,'” Lee Skallerup Bessette, Morehead State Univ.
  3. “Who Owns the Humanities?” George Louis Scheper, Community Coll. of Baltimore County, MD
  4. “Vulnerability and Academia: A Critical Analysis,” Paul Lauter, Trinity Coll., CT

Responding: Stacey Lee Donohue, Central Oregon Community Coll.

For abstracts, visit www.ccha-assoc.org/index.html after 1 Dec.

420. Social Pedagogies and Second-Language Development

Friday, 10 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Huron, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Sébastien Dubreil, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

  1. “The Emergent Multilingual Self during Study Abroad and What It Teaches Us about Language Instruction,” Glenn Levine, Univ. of California, Irvine
  2. “Curriculum Development in the Chinese-Heritage Language Classroom: Learners’ Defining Role,” Xuehua Xiang, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
  3. “Bridging the Print-Digital Divide with Social Reading,” Carl S. Blyth, Univ. of Texas, Austin

For abstracts, visit profd.weebly.com/mla-2014.html.

451. Theory and Practice in International Online Classroom Collaboration: An Electronic Roundtable

Saturday, 11 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Chicago VIII, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Zsuzsanna Palmer, Old Dominion Univ.

Speakers: Sarah Guth, State Univ. of New York Global Center; Alexander Hartwiger, Framingham State Univ.; Zsuzsanna Palmer

For abstracts and resources, write to zpalm001@odu.edu after 7 Jan.

This electronic roundtable showcases international online collaboration projects while theoretically situating them in order to reimagine these digital contact zones as sites for critical thinking. The speakers’ projects come from a range of disciplines—writing, literature, and language teaching—and identify the challenges and rewards of cross-cultural interaction in global classrooms.

463. New Arabic Genres

Saturday, 11 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Colorado, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Ken Seigneurie, Simon Fraser Univ., Surrey

  1. “Revolutionary Memoirs: Women, Nation, and the Arab World,” Tahia Abdel Nasser, American Univ. in Cairo
  2. “Scheherazadean Cyborgs: Arab Women Diarists in the Digital Age,” Nadine Sinno, Georgia State Univ.
  3. “Desire and the Canonization of Arabic Literature,” Kifah Hanna, Trinity Coll., CT
  4. “Illustrated War: Lamia Ziadé’s Bye Bye Babylon, the Art of Remembering, and the Lebanese Civil War,” Salah D. Hassan, Michigan State Univ.

For abstracts, visit tinyurl.com/c65bllb.

471. Who Benefits? Competing Agendas and Ethics in Graduate Education

Saturday, 11 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Chicago X, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: David B. Downing, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

Speakers: David B. Downing; Shane Peterson, Washington Univ. in St. Louis; Daniel Purdy, Penn State Univ., University Park; Katina Rogers, MLA; Jentery Sayers, Univ. of Victoria

This roundtable explores the responsibility programs have to graduate students given the current job market, including whether programs should continue to admit the same number of students, how to reform graduate education for the job market that exists, how to advise graduate students, and how program directors can respond to institutional pressure to grow, create, and maintain programs.

481. African Literature and Performance and New Media

Saturday, 11 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Colorado, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Moradewun Adejunmobi, Univ. of California, Davis

  1. “Teju Cole’s Twitter Feed and the Politics of Digital Form,” Mark DiGiacomo, Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick
  2. “Critic, Creator, Curator: Three Francophone African Writers and Authorial Presence on the Web,” Kristen Stern, Boston Univ.
  3. “New Media, Shifting Margins: Digital Divide Reconsidered,” Akinwumi Adesokan, Indiana Univ., Bloomington
  4. “The Place of Fiction in Southern Africa: New Media, Print, and Local Literary Ecologies,” Stephanie Bosch Santana, Harvard Univ.

482. Making Digital Counterpublics

Saturday, 11 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Arkansas, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: David Parry, Saint Joseph’s Univ.

  1. “Education Reform by Undergraduates: Giving Rural Students a Voice,” Lee Skallerup Bessette, Morehead State Univ.
  2. “From MOOC to POOC: Plurality, Participation, and JustPublics,” Matthew K. Gold, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York; Emily Sherwood, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York
  3. “A Beautiful Social Collaborative,” Aimee Knight, Saint Joseph’s Univ.
  4. “Fashioning Alternative Publics,” Kim Knight, Univ. of Texas, Dallas

For papers, abstracts, and resources, visit www.outsidethetext.com/main/making-digital-counterpublics.

485. Digital Practice: Social Networks across Borders

Saturday, 11 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Missouri, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Stefanie Harris, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

  1. “Kafka and the Kafkaesques: Close Reading Online Fan Fiction,” Bonnie Ruberg, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  2. “Aesthetics and Politics in Representing the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Germany: Markus Flohr’s Wo samstags immer Sonntag ist,” Isabelle Hesse, Univ. of York
  3. “Intersections of Music, Politics, and Digital Media: Bandista,” Ela Gezen, Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst

Responding: Yasemin Yildiz, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

For abstracts, visit german.berkeley.edu/transit.

526. Scholarly Journals: Academic and Commercial and Independent Perspectives

Saturday, 11 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Missouri, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Alan Rauch, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte

Speakers: William Breichner, Johns Hopkins University Press; Adam Burbage, Taylor and Francis; Alison Denby, Oxford University Press; Eileen Joy, BABEL Working Group; Dawne C. McCance, Mosaic; Margaret Zusky, John Wiley and Sons

This session brings together editors and journal publishers from university presses, commercial presses, and the independent sector. Our objective is to share multiple perspectives about the future of scholarly journals (digital and print). An open forum, we welcome comments from attendees.

528. Digital Humanities from the Ground Up

Saturday, 11 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Chicago VIII, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Amy E. Earhart, Texas A&M Univ., College Station

Speakers: Benjamin Doyle, Northeastern Univ.; Heather Froehlich, Univ. of Strathclyde; Kristi Girdharry, Northeastern Univ.; Kirstyn Leuner, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder; Amanda Licastro, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Michael Lin, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara; Benjamin Miller, Graduate Center, City Univ. of New York; Paige Morgan, Univ. of Washington, Seattle; David Tagnani, Washington State Univ., Pullman; Amanda Visconti, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

For abstracts, visit commons.mla.org/groups/computer-studies-in-language-and-literature/.

A showcase session to highlight innovative work by undergraduate and graduate students in the digital humanities. This session aims to demonstrate how students, at different levels and from a range of institutions, are expanding their research horizons by engaging in digital projects.

535. Medieval Literature, Digital Humanities

Saturday, 11 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Chicago X, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Geraldine Heng, Univ. of Texas, Austin

  1. “How We Read Now (in the Digital Middle Ages),” Stephen G. Nichols, Johns Hopkins Univ., MD
  2. “Bibliopedia: Humanities Scholarship as Linked Data,” Michael Widner, Stanford Univ.
  3. “A New Digital Cartography of ‘Convivencia': Sevilla 1492,” Thomas Patrick Kealy, Colby-Sawyer Coll.

543. Deletion, Erasure, Cancellation: Negative Textualities

Saturday, 11 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Purdue-Wisconsin, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Marjorie Luesebrink, Irvine Valley Coll., CA

Speakers: Laura All, Univ. of Virginia; Paul Benzon, Temple Univ., Philadelphia; Andrew Ferguson, Univ. of Virginia; Marjorie Luesebrink; Chuk Moran, Univ. of California, San Diego

For abstracts, visit paulbenzon.com/mla14panel/.

This roundtable considers practices that might collectively be termed “negative” textual operations. Bringing together a range of methods and perspectives, we intend to foster discussion of a framework in which qualities such as absence, removal, residuality, blankness, and illegibility become essential criteria for understanding textual materiality.

565. Online Innovations: From Distance Learning to MOOC Madness

Saturday, 11 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Michigan B, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Susan G. Polansky, Carnegie Mellon Univ.

Speakers: Thomas P. DiPiero, Univ. of Rochester; Chrissy Hosea, Yale Univ.; Christopher Jones, Carnegie Mellon Univ.; Fernando Rubio, Univ. of Utah; Lisa Vollendorf, San José State Univ.

Discussion of changing technologies and their impact on teaching and learning, including hybrid, blended, and flipped classes; online teaching; and MOOCs.

577. Evaluating Digital Scholarship: Candidate Success Stories

Saturday, 11 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Chicago VIII, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Victoria E. Szabo, Duke Univ.

Speakers: Cheryl E. Ball, Illinois State Univ.; Alexander Gil, Columbia Univ.; Matthew K. Gold, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York; Adeline Koh, Richard Stockton Coll. of New Jersey; Kari M. Kraus, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

Responding: N. Katherine Hayles, Duke Univ.

For a detailed description and participants’ project links, visit people.duke.edu/~ves4/mla14 after 1 Dec.

In an electronic roundtable, candidates from various institutions and backgrounds share work and describe successful navigation of appointment, tenure, and promotion. MLA guidelines on evaluating digital scholarship serve as context. Discussion of how shifting definitions of academic success may include interdisciplinary collaboration, public engagement, hybrid teaching/research, alt-ac.

582. Literary Social Media, Past and Present

Saturday, 11 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., O’Hare, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Jeremy Douglass, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

  1. “Writing Imperial Networks in Maria Edgeworth’s Irish Fiction,” Dermot Ryan, Loyola Marymount Univ.
  2. “The Century Guild Hobby Horse and the Ambivalence of the Victorian Literary Networks,” Rebecca N. Mitchell, Univ. of Texas–Pan American
  3. “Digital Darcy: Hypermediation in the Lizzie Bennet Diaries,” Kristina Booker, Southern Methodist Univ.

For abstracts, visit media.commons.mla.org/.

583. Electronic Literature after Flash

Saturday, 11 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Purdue-Wisconsin, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Mark Sample, George Mason Univ.

Speakers: Leonardo Flores, Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez; Christopher T. Funkhouser, New Jersey Inst. of Tech.; Dene M. Grigar, Washington State Univ., Vancouver; Mark C. Marino, Univ. of Southern California; Stuart Moulthrop, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Amanda Visconti, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Zach Whalen, Univ. of Mary Washington

This roundtable considers the future of electronic literature, which for over a decade has been dominated by works designed on Adobe’s Flash platform. The accomplished scholars, artists, and curators on this panel focus on the death of Flash e-lit, the study and preservation of Flash works, and the rise in electronic literature of HTML5, JavaScript, and apps.

586. Early Modern Media Ecologies

Saturday, 11 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Great America, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Jen Boyle, Coastal Carolina Univ.

  1. “Needlework Networks: Paper, Prints, and Female Authorship,” Whitney Trettien, Duke Univ.
  2. “Sidney Circularities: Music and Script in the Contrafactum Lyric,” Scott A. Trudell, Univ. of Maryland, College Park
  3. “Stage, Stall, Street, Sheet: Multimedia Shakespeare,” Adam G. Hooks, Univ. of Iowa

For abstracts, visit www.scotttrudell.com.

599. The Praxis Network: Rethinking Humanities Education, Together and in Public

Saturday, 11 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Arkansas, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Katina Rogers, MLA

Speakers: David F. Bell, Duke Univ.; Matthew K. Gold, New York City Coll. of Tech., City Univ. of New York; Kevin Kee, Brock Univ.; Cecilia Márquez, Univ. of Virginia; Kelli Massa, University Coll. London; William Albert Pannapacker, Hope Coll.; Donnie Sackey, Wayne State Univ.

For description of programs and overall project, visit praxis-network.org.

How can humanities programs better equip students for a wide range of careers, while also fostering methodological expertise and public engagement? This roundtable will discuss a few possible approaches as seen in the Praxis Network, a new international alliance of graduate and undergraduate programs that are making effective interventions in traditional models of humanities pedagogy and research.

618. FrostBytes: Archival Scholarship in the Digital Age

Saturday, 11 January, 3:30–4:45 p.m., Grace, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Mark Steed Richardson, Doshisha Univ.; Donald Sheehy, Edinboro Univ. of Pennsylvania

The workshop will share information about Frost collections and about the status of digitization and electronic cataloging at major collections. Tools and procedures for locating and acquiring materials will be discussed. Our purpose is to plan the creation, development, and maintenance of a comprehensive digital resource—under the aegis of the Frost Society—for Frost scholarship.

651. Women in the Expanding University: Global and Local

Saturday, 11 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Northwestern–Ohio State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Rebecka Rutledge Fisher, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Speakers: Diana Elizabeth Henderson, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Teresa Mangum, Univ. of Iowa; Margaret Soltan, George Washington Univ.; Catharine Roslyn Stimpson, New York Univ.

Women are often at the center of debates about technological pedagogy. Taking women and the “expanding university” as our framework, we will address pedagogical strategies, forms of community engagement, and prospects for women’s activism offered by new technologies. This session promises to open a space for critique of emerging technologies even as it identifies new avenues of innovation.

658. New Directions in William Carlos Williams Studies

Saturday, 11 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Sheffield, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Daniel Burke, Marquette Univ.

Speakers: Julia Bloch, Univ. of Pennsylvania; Samantha Carrick, Univ. of Southern California; Julia Daniel, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown; Margaret Konkol, Univ. at Buffalo, State Univ. of New York; Serena Le, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Lisa Siraganian, Southern Methodist Univ.; Erin Templeton, Converse Coll.

For abstracts, visit wcwsociety.wordpress.com/.

Speakers will present contemporary approaches to Williams studies in a “lightning talk” Pecha Kucha format. Topics will include Williams and aging, eco-Williams, Williams and contemporary pedagogy, Williams and food and drug studies, sonic Williams, and digital Williams.

659. Text-nology Idea Jam: Doing New and Old Things with Old and New Books

Saturday, 11 January, 5:15–6:30 p.m., Chicago H, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Tamara O’Callaghan, Northern Kentucky Univ.

Speakers: Clarissa Ai Ling Lee, Duke Univ.; William Germano, Cooper Union; Andrea R. Harbin, State Univ. of New York, Cortland; Tamara O’Callaghan; Katherine Ruffin, Wellesley Coll.; Eleanor F. Shevlin, West Chester Univ.; Sarah Werner, Folger Shakespeare Library

For idea itinerary, explanation of format, and proposed questions, visit www.nku.edu/~ocallaghant/IdeaJamMLA2014.htm.

This workshop is an “idea jam”—an event run by participants rather than by facilitators—on the impact of technology on the text and reading practices. Each facilitator will propose an open-ended question related to the idea jam topic. Participants then work with the facilitator whose question most intrigues them to brainstorm ideas, concerns, etc.

679. Decolonizing DH: Theories and Practices of Postcolonial Digital Humanities

Sunday, 12 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Purdue-Wisconsin, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Roopika Risam, Salem State Univ.

Speakers: Alexander Gil, Columbia Univ.; Adeline Koh, Richard Stockton Coll. of New Jersey; Porter Olsen, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Amit Ray, Rochester Inst. of Tech.

Responding: Anna Everett, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

For abstracts, visit dhpoco.org.

This roundtable outlines the shape of contemporary postcolonial digital humanities and interrogates how postcolonial studies have evolved through different phases of Internet culture. The roundtable begins a public conversation about the contours, stakes, and limits of postcolonial digital humanities by exploring the roles of colonialism, imperialism, and globalization in digital cultures.

692. Encoding and Decoding William Blake

Sunday, 12 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., Michigan–Michigan State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Sheila A. Spector, Brooklyn, NY

  1. “Encoding and Decoding Blake’s Book Illustrations: The Night Thoughts Watercolors,” Sheila A. Spector
  2. “William Blake’s Manuscript Production Decoded: How Blake Encoded Manuscript Culture in His Illuminated Works,” James Rovira, Tiffin Univ.

For abstracts, visit www.jamesrovira.com.

708. Critical Making in Digital Humanities

Sunday, 12 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Addison, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Roger Whitson, Washington State Univ., Pullman

  1. “Theorizing Collaborative Making: Between Writing, Programming, and Development,” Amaranth Borsuk, Univ. of Washington, Bothell; Dene M. Grigar, Washington State Univ., Vancouver
  2. “Toward a History of Critical Making in the Humanities,” Kari M. Kraus, Univ. of Maryland, College Park; Jentery Sayers, Univ. of Victoria

Responding: Garnet Hertz, Univ. of California, Irvine

For abstracts, visit www.rogerwhitson.net/criticalmaking2014 after 15 Dec.

717. Women, Collaboration, and New Media

Sunday, 12 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Great America, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Kate Flint, Univ. of Southern California

  1. “When to (Dis)Engage: Collaboration without Sexism,” Laura C. Mandell, Texas A&M Univ., College Station
  2. “Women + Collaboration + New Media = E-literature Literary Criticism,” Jessica Pressman, Univ. of California, San Diego
  3. “Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities,” Kathleen Woodward, Univ. of Washington, Seattle

724. The Data Is the Scholarship

Sunday, 12 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Parlor C, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Kenneth M. Price, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln

  1. “The Data of Revision: TextLab and the Theory of Fluid-Text Editing,” John Bryant, Hofstra Univ.; Nicholas Laiacona, Performant Software Solutions
  2. “Prime Timelines: Visualizing Televisual Time and Narrative Temporality,” Joel Burges, Univ. of Rochester; Nora Dimmock, Univ. of Rochester
  3. “Editing, Encoding, and Ambiguity in Folger Digital Texts,” Rebecca Niles, Folger Shakespeare Library; Michael Poston, Folger Shakespeare Library

738. Book History and Digital Humanities

Sunday, 12 January, 10:15–11:30 a.m., Lincolnshire, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Lise Jaillant, Newcastle Univ.

Speakers: Claire Battershill, Univ. of Reading; Michael Gavin, Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia; Matthew Lavin, Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln; Hannah McGregor, Univ. of Alberta; Greg Prickman, Univ. of Iowa; Andrew M. Stauffer, Univ. of Virginia; Elizabeth Willson Gordon, King’s Univ. Coll.

For abstracts, visit sharpweb.org.

Book history might evoke images of Luddite rare-books connoisseurs and bibliographers. Yet, book historians have long been interested in the impact of technological changes on the creation and diffusion of texts. This informal discussion will shed light on the digital future of book history and on the bibliographical roots of digital humanities.

748. Tumblr Vulnerabilities

Sunday, 12 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Aren Aizura, Arizona State Univ.

Speakers: Kara Jesella, New York Univ.; Nicholas Mitchell, Univ. of California, Berkeley; Roy Pérez, Willamette Univ.; Jeanne Vaccaro, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Responding: Alexis Lothian, Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

For abstracts, write to aren.aizura@gmail.com after 19 Nov.

How is the microblogging platform Tumblr an affective space for queer and dangerous critique in and outside the academy? What are the politics of blogging on Tumblr as scholars in a professional climate where “online presence” is the consummate CV attribute? How does Tumblr provoke or align itself with the specter of the digital humanities and its proprietary software platforms?

754. Lit Misbehaving: Responding to New and Changing Modes of Creative Production

Sunday, 12 January, 12:00 noon–1:15 p.m., Northwestern–Ohio State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Rachael Sullivan, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

  1. “Bonfires, Lesbians, Depression, and Rape: Twine, Feminist Voices, and Agency in Game Narratives,” Anastasia Salter, Univ. of Baltimore
  2. “Turn Up the Opacity: Discussing Discomfort with Digital Modes,” Daniel Anderson, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  3. “E-books, Typography, and Twitter Art,” Zach Whalen, Univ. of Mary Washington

Responding: Stuart Moulthrop, Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

For abstracts, visit rachaelsullivan.com.

776. E-literature and Translations: Database, Platform, Language

Sunday, 12 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Chicago A–B, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Kathi Inman Berens, Univ. of Southern California

  1. “Remediating LidantJU fAram,” Jonathan Baillehache, Univ. of Georgia
  2. “Lost and Found in Translation: How the Electronic Literature Knowledge Base Translates a Field into Data,” Jill Walker Rettberg, Univ. of Bergen
  3. “Meditation Level Up: Sony Playstation 2 and The Night Journey,” Kathi Inman Berens

For abstracts, visit kathiiberens.com/2013/05/31/mla14-panel/.

782. Geospatial Literary Studies

Sunday, 12 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Ontario, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: David Joseph Wrisley, American Univ. of Beirut

  1. “The Meanings of the City: A Data-Mining Approach to Mapping Early Modern London,” Anupam Basu, Washington Univ. in St. Louis
  2. “Locating the Bookstore: Antebellum Literary Landscapes and Contemporary Interpretive Practice,” Kristen Doyle Highland, New York Univ.
  3. “Mapping (Dis)Ease: Narratives of Influenza and Migration during the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic,” Anne Stachura, Univ. of Texas–Pan American
  4. “Mapping Knowledge Networks in British Newspapers of the Long Eighteenth Century,” Rachael King, New York Univ.

792. Old Materials, New Materialisms

Sunday, 12 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Missouri, Sheraton Chicago

Presiding: Robert Markley, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana

  1. “Objects, Authors, and Other Matter(s) in the Gloria Anzaldúa Archive,” Suzanne M. Bost, Loyola Univ., Chicago
  2. “Writing Histories of Listening: Acoustemology as Literary Practice,” Ely Rosenblum, Univ. of Cambridge
  3. “Even the Stones Cry Out: Archival Research and the Inhuman Turn,” Andrew Ferguson, Univ. of Virginia
  4. “A Life of Its Own: A Vital Materialist Look at the Medieval Manuscript as an Agentic Assemblage,” Angela Bennett Segler, New York Univ.

805. In the Meme Time

Sunday, 12 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Northwestern–Ohio State, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: John W. Mowitt, Univ. of Leeds

  1. “C’est la même,” Sarah Juliet Lauro, Clemson Univ.
  2. “Vaccinating against the Virus of the Mind: Incorporating Agency into the Meme Equation,” Kate Miltner, Social Media Collective, Microsoft Research New England
  3. “All Together Now: Beyond the Totalizing Meme,” Peter Krapp, Univ. of California, Irvine

807. Traffic

Sunday, 12 January, 1:45–3:00 p.m., Indiana-Iowa, Chicago Marriott

Presiding: Mark Goble, Univ. of California, Berkeley

  1. “Traffic in High-Frequency Stock Trading: Risk and Instability with the Nonhuman,” N. Katherine Hayles, Duke Univ.
  2. “The Project: Transmedia Games and Network Aesthetics,” Patrick Jagoda, Univ. of Chicago
  3. “The View from Above,” Kate Marshall, Univ. of Notre Dame

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